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The running back position has taken a huge hit this in the past few months, and more specifically, the last few weeks. We knew that it was highly unlikely that Todd Gurley was going to get the same work as he did last year. And with both Ezekiel Elliott and Melvin Gordon still holding out, that takes away two more elite options at the position. As you’ll see as you take a look at my rankings, Elliott and Gordon are quite a ways down in my rankings. And Gurley also has taken a hit since we don’t know what his workload will be like.

More so this year than in others, load up early and often at the running back position. If they’re both of a similar skill level, I’ll take the running back over the wide receiver nine times out of 10. And with all that being said, here are my top 70 running backs going into the year (as of 8/15).

1. Saquon Barkley, New York Giants
The hype surrounding Saquon was unreal as he came into the league, and he did not disappoint. Over 2,000 total yards and 15 TDs led Saquon to win the league’s Rookie of the Year award. It’s even more impressive if you consider that he did this with the shell of Eli Manning as his QB. With Odell gone and the Giants’ receivers going down like flies, Barley’s efficiency should take a dip as he’ll be focused in on much more this year. And even with Eli being his QB/a very depleted receiving core, I expect Saquon to post similar numbers this year, thanks to get more touches. Barkley is the most complete back in the league, and will top a lot of draft boards this year.

Ceiling: RB #1
Floor: Top 15 RB

2. Christian McCaffrey, Carolina Panthers
Nearly every stat went up for McCaffrey from his rookie to sophomore year. His yards per carry went from 3.7 to 5.0, carries went from 117 to 219, and receptions went from 80 to 107. Coming into the league, we knew McCaffrey was going to be a top end receiving back (if not, the top receiving back) in the league. But with the improvement on the ground from year one to year two, that has propelled McCaffrey from being a low end RB one to high end RB two to a top RB one.

Ceiling: RB #1
Floor: Top 10 RB

3. Alvin Kamara, New Orleans Saints
Kamara’s stats from year one to year two are what I’m expecting from Saquon Barkley: lower efficiency, but more work to offset the lower efficiency. No, Kamara wasn’t going to replicate the 6.1 yards per carry he averaged as a rookie, but a 4.6 average is still very good. With Mark Ingram now in Baltimore, Kamara will get even more work. In the four games without Ingram, Kamara had 275 yards rushing on 56 attempts (4.9 yards per carry) with five TDs and 336 receiving yards on 35 receptions (9.6 yards per catch) and one TD. In the 11 games with Ingram? 608 rushing yards on 138 carries (4.4 yards per carry) with three TDs and 373 receiving yards on 46 receptions (8.1 yards per catch) and three TDs. The numbers should swing closer to the ones he put up without Ingram. Expect New Orleans to fully unleash Kamara.

Ceiling: RB #1
Floor: Top 10 RB

4. David Johnson, Arizona Cardinals
The last two years haven’t been nice to Johnson. He got hurt in week one in 2017 and had a disappointing 2018. However, it might not have been Johnson’s fault (entirely). The offensive line was one of the worst in all of football last year. Not to mention, Steve Wilks was a disaster as head coach, and Josh Rosen wasn’t much better at QB. And with all of this, Johnson was a top 10 running back. 2019 will be very different for this offense. Kliff Kingsbury is now at the helm, and the #1 overall pick Kyler Murray will now run the offense. The offensive line should be at least a little better than last year, with five new linemen and A.Q. Shipley returning from injury. Johnson’s 2019 season should look much more like his 2016 season than his 2018 season.

Ceiling: Top 3 RB
Floor: Weekly flex starter

5. Joe Mixon, Cincinnati Bengals
As Cincinnati’s primary back last year, Mixon took huge strides as a runner. He doubled his rushing TDs from year one to year two, and finished fourth in the entire league in rushing, thanks to averaging almost a yard and a half more a rushing attempt as a sophomore. Mixon was also used even more in the passing game, averaging about four targets a game. That role could grow even more this year, as A.J. Green will most likely miss the first couple of games of this season. This is shaping up to be the year where Mixon becomes the focal point of the Bengals offense, and cement himself as a top running back in both the NFL and fantasy football.

Ceiling: Top 3 RB
Floor: Top 20 RB

6. Todd Gurley, Los Angeles Rams
If you told me back in November that Gurley wouldn’t be the consensus #1 pick in fantasy for the 2019 season, I would’ve laughed in your face. But, here we are now. Gurley absolutely balled out last year, leading some people to championships (or at the very least, to the playoffs) nearly single-handedly. Gurley had 16 rushing attempts in the divisional game versus Dallas, but then had 14 rushes in the NFC Championship game and Super Bowl combined. The left knee must have been much worse than was reported. Why would Los Angeles use C.J. Anderson (who had only been on the roster for a few months) instead of Todd Gurley if Gurley was completely healthy? I do expect rookie Darrell Henderson to take some of Gurley’s work away from him, but Henderson won’t become the guy if Gurley misses games. Henderson’s role should stay relatively the same, but it should be Malcom Brown who should become the Rams running back you’d wanna start.

Ceiling: RB #1
Floor: Weekly flex starter

7. James Conner, Pittsburgh Steelers
The whole Le’Veon Bell situation was an absolute mess and nightmare last year, but Conner stepped up in a big way a delivered after being thrusted into the starter for Pittsburgh. Despite missing weeks 13-16, he was tied for 11th in rushing yards and tied for third in rushing TDs. With 55 catches, Conner also provides value as a pass catcher. And with most fantasy leagues being PPR or half PPR, you need to be at least competent in the passing game to be an elite fantasy running back. While Conner has that upside (after all, he was an elite running back last year), I think Jaylen Samuels will cut into Conner’s workload this year.

Ceiling: Top 3 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

8. Le’Veon Bell, New York Jets
After holding out all of last year, Le’Veon is back and ready to prove that he deserves the big contract he got. Last we saw Bell, he was a top two pick in fantasy, and arguably the top running back in the entire league. Now with the Jets, Bell has a worse supporting cast at every position. Sam Darnold is still a young, unproven quarterback. And Robby Anderson is nowhere close to the level of Antonio Brown or JuJu Smith-Schuster. Defenses will be able to focus in more on Bell now that he is in New York. But it is still Le’Veon Bell, and he could prove to be the top option at running back at seasons end.

Ceiling: RB #1
Floor: Weekly flex starter

9. Dalvin Cook, Minnesota Vikings
Cook missed most 12 games of the 2017 season, and five last year. Despite missing more than half his game as a pro, Cook has been impressive when he’s been on the field. From week 12 on last year (when he was healthy), Cook had the seventh most points among running backs. With Kevin Stefanski now the offensive coordinator, Cook’s workload should increase, as Stefanski likes to run the ball more than most play callers. Not to mention, the workload should increase with Latavius Murray now in New Orleans. If Cook can stay healthy, he can be a dark horse fantasy MVP candidate.

Ceiling: Top 5 RB
Floor: Weekly flex starter

10. Nick Chubb, Cleveland Browns
Even only getting 16 carries in the first six weeks, Chubb still ended the year 10th in the entire league in rushing. And he was used almost exclusively in the running game. He had 29 targets for the entire year, and all but one of them came when he became the starter in week seven. Chubb would be higher in my rankings, but the signing of Kareem Hunt worries me. When Hunt can play again in week 10, we don’t know how the carries between the two will shake out.. I think Chubb will be leaned up heavily in the first half of the season, but during the playoff stretch run, Chubb might not be the elite RB one that he once was.

Ceiling: Top 5 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

11. Damien Williams, Kansas City Chiefs
Williams has been around for a few years, and last year he finally got a shot at being a featured running back. And he did not disappoint. In the five games without Hunt on the Chiefs, Williams had 255 rushing yards on 47 attempts and a pair of TDs. Andy Reid typical uses one running back, and it’s normally been a very good one for fantasy. Carlos Hyde is now in town, and Reid did hint that he could use much more of a committee than what he normally uses. But if Williams keeps the job to himself, he could prove that last year wasn’t a fluke.

Ceiling: Top 5 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

12. Devonta Freeman, Atlanta Falcons
Last year was a lost year for Freeman. He missed all but two games with injury. But before his injuries, he looked like he was going to have another year of around 1,000 yards and double digit TDs. Even though Freeman has only missed three games in his career (before last year), he has had his fair share of injuries, most notably concussions. Tevin Coleman is now gone, so Freeman will be able to get as many touches as he wants. And while he might not be the best receiving back in the league, he has shown that he can put up respectable numbers as a pass catcher (even though his role in the passing game has diminished). If he can stay healthy for an entire year, he can be a mid RB one by the end of the year.

Ceiling: Top 10 RB
Floor: Weekly flex/RB starter

13. Aaron Jones, Green Bay Packers
Jones missed the first two and last two games of the 2018 season. And while Jones hasn’t gotten as much work as he (probably) has wanted, he has been one of the most efficient rushers the first two years he’s been in the league for (averaging 5.5 yards per carry each season). The first four games of the year (for him, weeks three through six) he only reached double digit touches once, and averaged an even eight rushes a game. Weeks eight through 14 (we’ll toss out week 15 when he left early with an MCL sprain)? He had double digit carries in each game and averaged nearly 14 carries a game, and averaged a shade under 20 fantasy points per game. If Jones can become the starter under new head coach Matt LaFleur, Jones has the upside to be a top five running back.

Ceiling: Top 5 RB
Floor: Matchup dependent flex/RB starter

14. Kerryon Johnson, Detroit Lions
The second year running back was having a solid rookie season before going down with a knee injury in November. Johnson was averaging 15 touches a game (11.8 rushes, 3.2 receptions). With Theo Riddick now in Denver, Johnson will be expected to step up in Detroit’s passing game. And with training camp now in full swing, he appears to be fully recovered from the knee injury that cut his rookie season short. But Johnson does deal with his fair share of injuries. He was at Auburn for three seasons and even though he only missed four games, the injury history is alarming. He dealt with rib, ankle, and hamstring injuries. And that’s not including shoulder injuries that he even had all the way back in high school. If Johnson can stay healthy, he has the upside to be a RB one by the end of the year.

Ceiling: Top 10 RB
Floor: Weekly flex/RB starter

15. James White, New England Patriots
The former Super Bowl hero had a career year in 2018. White had career highs in every statistical category, except for yards per catch. In fact, White was #7 running back in fantasy last year. It’ll be tough to finish that high again, as New England is always changing what players they use from week to week. However, there are quite a few new faces in New England. And Gronk is retired. White has Tom Brady’s trust, and proved that he can produce when given a bigger workload. White could prove that last year wasn’t a fluke.

Ceiling: Top 10 RB
Floor: Borderline flex/RB starter

16. Josh Jacobs, Oakland Raiders
Jacobs was the first running back selected in the 2019 NFL Draft. What he lacks in speed he makes up for in strength, patience, and footwork. While he might not seem like he’d be a pass catcher, he proved to be effective when used in the passing game at Alabama. He might not have been used as a true bell cow running back, but he could be used as one in Oakland. Oakland did use a first round pick on him and while that doesn’t always correlate to touches, the other running backs on the roster are mostly older guys past their prime.

Ceiling: Top 5 RB
Floor: Matchup dependent flex/RB starter

17. Marlon Mack, Indianapolis Colts
Mack is another back who could be a monster if he gets more work. He isn’t going to be used much in the passing game and that could hold him back from being a high end RB one, but his rushing is good enough to make him at least a solid RB two. Fun fact about Mack’s 2018: he played in the same number of games as Melvin Gordon (12) and had more rushing yards than him (908 to 885). With Luck health being questioned once again, Mack should be in line to get even more work this year, and could end up being an RB one by years end.

Ceiling: Top 10 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB Starter

18. Mark Ingram, Baltimore Ravens
After being Robin to Alvin Kamara’s Batman, the Saints decided not to resign Mark Ingram. Ingram has still been a solid fantasy starter even in a diminished role the past two years. With Ingram now being in Baltimore, Ingram will be the feature back in a very heavy run offense. While he only had about one and a half receptions a game last year, a lot of that can be attributed to being in the same backfield as Alvin Kamara. But in the two seasons before Kamara, Ingram had 50 and 46 catches, respectively. Expect a heavy workload from Ingram in the running game and production as a pass catcher to be closer to his 2015 and 2016 seasons than his 2017 and 2018 seasons.

Ceiling: Top 12 RB
Floor: Weekly flex/RB starter

19. Chris Carson, Seattle Seahawks
Seattle used a first round pick on Rashaad Penny in 2018, but Carson was able to keep a hold of the starting job for the season. Carson’s upside will be limited by the fact that he isn’t much of a pass catcher, but that still doesn’t mean that he isn’t useful. He had 1,151 yards and nine TDs as rusher. In the four games last year that Carson had single digit fantasy games, he had single digit carries in three of them. And post bye week, he averaged a little less than 17 points per game in the nine games he played in (he missed week 10). If he can keep the starting job, Carson can be a high end RB two/low end RB one.

Ceiling: Top 12 RB
Floor: Matchup dependent flex/RB starter

20. Ezekiel Elliott, Dallas Cowboys
Elliott has been arguably the premier running back since coming into the league in 2016. And after coming off a season where he more than doubled his career rushing TDs, Zeke wants to get paid. He’s threatening to hold out and after Le’Veon Bell’s hold out last year, who knows how this will all play out. The deadline of August 6th has now passed, so Zeke is now entering uncharted territory. He needed to report by then to get a full year of service for the 2019 so he could become an unrestricted free agent after the 2020 season. This situation is starting to get ugly, and Zeke has repeatedly said that he isn’t playing this year until he gets a new deal. If this hold out continues into the regular season, I expect Alfred Morris to get first crack at being the new Dallas starting running back.

Ceiling: RB #1
Floor: N/A

21. Leonard Fournette, Jacksonville Jaguars
Last year was a tough year for the former #4 overall pick. Between injury and suspension, Fournette only played in eight games in 2018. Fournette injured his hamstring in week one and then again in week four when he returned. He also dealt with injuries his rookie year and often throughout his LSU career. But when he’s been on the field, he’s shown flashes of why he was drafted so high. Even with Blake Bortles at QB, Fournette has been a top 12 fantasy running back from a points per game perspective each of his first two years in the league. If Fournette can stay healthy, having a better QB (Nick Foles) to take pressure off him could lead to Fournette having a huge bounce back season.

Ceiling: Top 10 RB
Floor: Matchup dependent flex/RB starter

22. Sony Michel, New England Patriots
New England plays the matchup much more than any other team in the league, and the way they use their running backs is no exception. Michel had the most carries on the team, and the least amount of receptions on the team. And while Michel got double digit carries in all 13 games he played in, he was a lot more TD dependent than you would think for someone who got consistent work. He didn’t have a single game in which he had double digit fantasy points in games where he didn’t have a TD. Michel’s upside should be limited to a low end RB two or flex starter if he isn’t used more in the passing game.

Ceiling: Top 15 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

23. Phillip Lindsay, Denver Broncos
The Broncos spent a third round pick on a rookie running back in the 2018 draft, and it was the undrafted rookie Phillip Lindsay who became the go to Denver running back. While Lindsay did average an impressive 5.4 yards per carry, it dropped down to a staggering 2.6 the last three games. That could be just a fluke, but what if the league started to catch up to Lindsay? There have been cases of elite NFL players going undrafted, but those are very rare exceptions. Lindsay will still have a big role in this offense, but it probably won’t be as big as it was last year. Royce Freeman should get more work, and Theo Riddick will be used as the top pass catcher out of the backfield when he gets back from injury. We might have already seen the best from Lindsay after his rookie year.

Ceiling: Top 15 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

24. Tarik Cohen, Chicago Bears
If you can compare Chicago’s offense to New England’s, Tarik Cohen is the James White for Chicago. Being a smaller running back, Cohen is never going to be used as a true workhorse running back. But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t provide fantasy value. Cohen is one of the league’s elite pass catchers out of the backfield. He finished top 10 among running backs in targets (91), receptions (71), yards (725), yards per catch (8.0), and TDs (five). The receiving numbers landed Cohen as running back 11 by the end of the year. With David Montgomery replacing Jordan Howard, Cohen’s role shouldn’t change, and the production increase with Mitch Trubisky now in year three.

Ceiling: Top 15 RB
Floor: Weekly flex starter

25. David Montgomery, Chicago Bears
With Chicago trading Jordan Howard to Philadelphia, Chicago drafted Montgomery with hopes of using him in a similar role. Montgomery should be the starter to Tarik Cohen’s change of pace running back. Montgomery averaged 21.4 carries as a junior at Iowa State, so he should be able to handle being a lead running back. Montgomery won’t win many foot races with defenders, but he makes up for that with power and vision. But while he can be used as a pass catcher out of the backfield, he might not be used much in the passing game with Tarik Cohen there. Unless he can carve out a decent role in the passing game, his upside will be limited.

Ceiling: Top 15 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

26. Miles Sanders, Philadelphia Eagles
Sanders got lost on the depth chart a bit at Penn State, as he was behind Saquon Barkley his first two years. But in his lone season as starter, Sanders showed that he was one of the top running backs in the nation. Sanders is a patient runner with great footwork. Sanders also proved he could be used as an effective receiver out of the backfield. Philadelphia did trade for Jordan Howard this offseason, who will probably get first crack at being the feature back. But Sanders at the very least should be the primary pass catcher out of the backfield. And if he can take away carries from Howard, Sanders could be a solid RB two with high upside.

Ceiling: Top 15 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

27. Melvin Gordon, Los Angeles Chargers
Stop me when you’ve heard this one before: an elite running back wants a big contract extension, and is holding out of training camp to get one. But Gordon has proven that he is one of the premier running backs in the league. He missed four games last year, and still 1,375 yards from scrimmage and 14 TDs. Does he deserve to get paid what he’s asking for? Personally, I think so. But both Gordon and the Chargers seem to be firm at their respective numbers, and he seems prepared to miss regular season games. If it does get that far (which I think it will), expect Austin Ekeler and Justin Jackson to be much more of a running back by committee than Ekeler being the lead back.

Ceiling: Top 3 RB
Floor: N/A

28. Derrius Guice, Washington Redskins
Outside of Saquon Barkley, Guice was the rookie with the most hype going into the 2018 season. But that quickly died, as he tore his left ACL in a preseason game. Guice has still been dealing with that left knee. And on top of this, Washington’s backfield is cluttered right now. Adrian Peterson is still around, and Chris Thompson should continue to get work. If Guice can stay healthy, the hype he had last year could gain momentum once again. Guice has the size, speed, and hands to be a three down workhorse. Guice will be a high risk, high reward pick for fantasy players.

Ceiling: Top 15 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

29. Derrick Henry, Tennessee Titans
If you look at just the end of year stats, Henry had a solid year. But 408 of his 1,059 rushing yards and six of his 12 rushing TDs came in two weeks (14 and 15). Those two performances won many people their league’s last year, but just to get to that point was excruciating. And that’s if you even held onto him all year. He only had one double digit performance in Tennessee’s first seven games last year.

Ceiling: Top 15 RB
Floor: Matchup dependent flex/RB starter

30. Jordan Howard, Philadelphia Eagles
Last year was the worst season Howard had in his three years in Chicago. He failed to gain 1,000 rushings yards for the first time, and his yards per carry average dropped to below four (3.7). Even with these struggles, Howard finished 20th amongst fantasy running backs. Even though he is now an Eagle, Howard should still be used in the same role as he was as a Bear. If Howard is in the game, expect him to get the ball via the run. Unless Howard surprises ‘everyone and is used steadily in the passing game, Howard’s upside will be capped as a RB two or flex starter.

Ceiling: Top 15 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

31. Austin Ekeler, Los Angeles Chargers
Ceiling: Top 15 RB
Floor: Handcuff to Melvin Gordon

32. Tevin Coleman, San Francisco 49ers
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Matchup dependent flex/RB starter

33. Darrell Henderson, Los Angeles Rams
Ceiling: Top 15 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

34. Kenyan Drake, Miami Dolphins
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

35. Latavius Murray, New Orleans Saints
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

36. Rashaad Penny, Seattle Seahawks
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

37. Peyton Barber, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

38. Lamar Miller, Houston Texans
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

39. Jerick McKinnon, San Francisco 49ers
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

40. Jaylen Samuels, Pittsburgh Steelers
Ceiling: Top 12 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

41. Alfred Morris, Dallas Cowboys
Ceiling: Weekly flex starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

42. Royce Freeman, Denver Broncos
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

43. Ito Smith, Atlanta Falcons
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

44. LeSean McCoy, Buffalo Bills
Ceiling: Top 20
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

45. Ronald Jones, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

46. Nhyeim Hines, Indianapolis Colts
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

47. Jalen Richard, Oakland Raiders
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

48. Carlos Hyde, Kansas City Chiefs
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

49. Kalen Ballage, Miami Dolphins
Ceiling: Borderline flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

50. Duke Johnson Jr., Houston Texans
Ceiling: Borderline flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

51. Dion Lewis, Tennessee Titans
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

52. Justin Jackson, Los Angeles Chargers
Ceiling: Weekly flex starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

53. Damien Harris, New England Patriots
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

54. C.J. Anderson, Detroit Lions
Ceiling: Borderline flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

55. Jamaal Williams, Green Bay Packers
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

56. Malcolm Brown, Los Angeles Rams
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Handcuff to Todd Gurley

57. Chris Thompson, Washington Redskins
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

58. Matt Breida, San Francisco 49ers
Ceiling: Borderline flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

59. Giovani Bernard, Cincinnati Bengals
Ceiling: Top 20 RB
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

60. Kareem Hunt, Cleveland Browns
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

61. Tony Pollard, Dallas Cowboys
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

62. Alexander Mattison, Minnesota Vikings
Ceiling: Borderline flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

63. Gus Edwards, Baltimore Ravens
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

64. Adrian Peterson, Washington Redskins
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Retired

65. Mike Davis, Chicago Bears
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

66. Devin Singeltary, Buffalo Bills
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

67. Darwin Thompson, Kansas City Chiefs
Ceiling: Borderline flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

68. Chase Edmonds, Arizona Cardinals
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

69. Alfred Blue, Jacksonville Jaguars
Ceiling: Weekly flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

70. Ty Montgomery, New York Jets
Ceiling: Borderline flex/RB starter
Floor: Emergency flex/RB starter

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https://i1.wp.com/www.myfantasysportstalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/1d80adc00d26dff6cc69fc4e8ede8e67-3.jpg?fit=1024%2C683&ssl=1https://i1.wp.com/www.myfantasysportstalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/1d80adc00d26dff6cc69fc4e8ede8e67-3.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Graham SweetFantasyFF RankingsNFLRecent PostsFantasty football,Fantasy Football,Fantasy Football Rankings,running backsThe running back position has taken a huge hit this in the past few months, and more specifically, the last few weeks. We knew that it was highly unlikely that Todd Gurley was going to get the same work as he did last year. And with both Ezekiel Elliott...