Image result for sid haigThe horror world was rocked to its very foundation yesterday with the news that icon and legend Sid Haig passed away on Saturday, September 21st, leaving behind his wife of Susan Oberg, whom he married in 2007. Social media has been filled with pictures from conventions and stories about how great of a guy Sid was when surrounded by his fans. No one had a bad story about him, and no one had an unpleasant memory of their interactions.

Born Sidney Eddie Mosesian on July 14, 1939, he is probably most well-known (at least recently) for his roles in the Rob Zombie films House of 1000 Corpses, The Devil’s Rejects and the recently released 3 From Hell in which he played recurring character Captain Spaulding (as well as in 2009’s animated feature The Haunted World of El Superbeasto). But his career began in 1959 when he played Augie the Hood in The Untouchables television series, and he had roles in the old Batman series in 1966, Star Trek, Gunsmoke, Mission: Impossible, Mannix, Get Smart, and more.

He’s got nearly 150 acting credits to his name, working consistently for six decades with fifty films and roughly 350 episodes of television programs! He was far more than just a horror actor (although that was a large portion of his resume) but he also did spots on Just the Ten of Us and Adam Green’s Holliston in which he played himself.

For many years, Sid only played one type of character and actually retired in 1992, tired of being typecast as a bad guy or the heavy opposite the hero on whatever show on which he happened to be working. He has said that one role that he always regretted passing on was that of Marsellus Wallace in Pulp Fiction. I could definitely see him in that role, and I think he would have absolutely crushed it, bringing the same intensity to this role that he brought to everything I’ve seen him do. He did eventually work with Tarantino in Jackie Brown as the Judge, a part that was specifically written for him.

His death leaves a massive void in the horror community, one which will never be filled. He touched so many lives through his work and through his appearances at conventions across the country. Sid always had time for his fans, and was a genuinely classy person, even though he could be larger than life and full of energy. He could be intimidating, but once you got past the on-screen persona and started talking to him you would see what a smart, funny, and pleasant person he was.

Rest well, Sid. You’ve earned it. You will be missed.

 

Patrick Rahall covers entertainment for MFST. Follow him on Twitter @patrickrahall.

Patrick Rahall

Writer of horror books, sports and entertainment articles, and comic book reviews.Host of the Throwdown Thursday Podcast, Angry Nerd and Jedi Ninja.I'm eagerly anticipating the zombie apocalypse to get out of my credit card debt.

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