the power knights

  Name:
Keithan Jones
Your Creative Title:
KID comics Owner
Location:
San Diego, CA.
Website(s):
Your Credits:
Artist/Writer of The Power Knights

The Seven   QueStIoNS of Diversity 

How has being recognized as a (insert diversity significance) creator impacted your career/creativity?
Well, it definitely comes with preconceptions of WHO I am as an artist and person. Given the opportunity, I’d rather just be seen as an artist period. That said, I recognize the impact I can have as an artist of color on comics and society in general. That impact can combat negative stereotypes or reinforce them. One thing I will not do is perpetrate a stunt. Meaning, I will not compromise who I am as an individual just to prove I’m down for the cause.

What Indie Title do you feel best speaks to Diversity or issues not often covered by main stream comics such as the Samaritan by Victor Dandridge JR?
I have no idea what’s best. I don’t necessarily go into a comic shop looking for that. But a comic called, Brother Man by Dawud Anyabwile comes to mind. I’ve been a fan of that series since the early 90’s. He recently released Brother Man, Revelation. It’s an origin story that takes it’s time to advance the character from childhood to ultimately becoming a superhero. Brother Man is a black protagonist, that lives in a predominately black city that tackles a variety of social/political issues. Something that can’t really be avoided when you write stories based on the diaspora of the African American. I mean the politics and constructs of this country’s constitution is in large part due to our place in United States society. But Brother Man is also about family. A caring mother and father. Dinner at the table. I really like that element about it. Far too often, images of black men and women in pop culture, depict us as ultra aggressive, coldblooded, goofballs. “Super predators” as they say. Living in the ghetto does not equal being black. Living in the ghetto equals living in the ghetto and everything that comes with it. Most poor people of any race, struggle with the same dynamics. Lack of money and opportunity leads to some very desperate measures. Not because they are inherently bad people.

Who is someone you consider a hero of Diversity and why them?
I would have to say, Muhammad Ali. He was my first real life superhero. A larger than life figure who was outspoken about important subjects. Although in the 70’s I was too young to truly understand what he was saying. For years I didn’t even know he use to be Cassius Clay. And growing up in a rural part of Memphis, TN. I didn’t experience overt racism until I moved with my family to California around 8 or 9 yrs old. So I didn’t have any preconceptions about anyone until I was confronted in that manner. That and seeing Roots for the first time- Holy shit. That was a horror show- LOL!

In 2017 as a Creator and reader of comics, do you think  Comics are now truly Diverse?
In a safe way, yes. In terms of the big two, they are pushing some boundaries ethnically and even gender wise, but I would like to see more original characters take center stage. Most of what’s going on now is known properties being given a new paint job so to speak. Kind of hedging their bets. But I applaud them nevertheless, for recognizing the underserved demographic. This is where publishers like KID come in. We aim to serve that far too long ignored comics fanbase. But still be inclusive to all comic fans.

Do you think the big 2 have an understanding of how to make their comics  diverse or is it more of a tool for them use, to sell comics and that makes it come off as ungenuine?
 That’s a question for the creative team put on a project not so much Marvel/DC as companies. They recognize the need for it and they recognize there is money to be made with it. I fault no one for making a profit in a strategic way. People have to eat. The big two don’t have to do anything by way of diversity. It so happens to be good business. But there are those in business and on the fan side who can’t get past their own prejudices to even enjoy it. I call these people, relics.

Do you feel Indie Comics can be a platform to create social change as Marvel once did  in the 60’s by exposing New ideas  and POV’s  to readers though comics?
Of course! I really want to see more female comic creators come to the forefront. Not just a name, I want to see their faces. I love personalities. We would love to have a great female artist/writer at KID one day. In time, we are VERY young still.

What are your hopes and dreams for the future and do you think you will see them come true in your lifetime?  
I HOPE people really do find a way to global peace. But I’m not sure man is capable of controlling his emotions to that extent. In practical terms, I want to build KID to be a major force in comics and film entertainment. Oh- and pay my student loans off.

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https://i2.wp.com/www.myfantasysportstalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/IMG_8391-820x1024.jpg?fit=820%2C1024&ssl=1https://i2.wp.com/www.myfantasysportstalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/IMG_8391-820x1024.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1WrittenSins..comComicsEntertainmentIndie ComicsDiversity,Kethian Jones,KID,The Power Knights  Name: Keithan Jones Your Creative Title: KID comics Owner Location: San Diego, CA. Website(s): kid-comics.com Your Credits: Artist/Writer of The Power Knights The Seven   QueStIoNS of Diversity  How has being recognized as a (insert diversity significance) creator impacted your career/creativity? Well, it definitely comes with preconceptions of WHO I am as an artist and person....Why go anywhere else for sports and entertainment?