powerless

 

Last night marked the beginning of a new DC comics television show, Powerless. But in contrast to its comic counterparts, it’s a comedy that airs on NBC focusing on a team of insurance workers rather than crime-fighting superheroes. Although it’s deemed as a DC TV show, Powerless lacks the constrictions of comic storylines and comic characters because it’s not about heroes or villains, it’s about the people. Or more specifically, the people who are also trying to make a difference by creating gadgets to help protect themselves against the debris of it all.

The show, or the pilot at the very least, focuses on Emily Locke, played by Vanessa Hudgens, a peppy and positive trying to lead the very uninspired team of insurance workers at what seems to be a failing security company. Van Wayne, apparently a very distant cousin to billionaire Bruce Wayne, has set his sights on going to work in Gotham alongside his cousin, who he seems to envy and idolize at the same time. Wayne Security proves to be faltering as Bruce decides to eliminate his losses, thereby firing all employees and sending Van to Gotham city. All of this happening on Emily’s first day.

Being the confident leader that she is, Emily makes it her own personal mission to come up with a big idea to save the business and everyone’s job. She really is the cheerleader of the team as well as the new girl that no one will take seriously. But despite her unpopularity, she wants to see Wayne Security succeed because she truly believes the company can make a difference and eventually her plans follow through as a device is created to detect the scent of the bad guy, giving the defenseless citizens of Charm City time to protect themselves from harm.

Overall, I think this show is definitely designed for a specific purpose, which is to make us laugh as well as lift our spirits. Like aforementioned, it is advertised DC television show, but it isn’t necessarily apparent while watching as a comic book fan. Obscure, unknown, and even a little foolish superheroes and criminals are used, partly insulting the art that goes into creating a hero or a villain in the comic book world. But as a sitcom, it serves its purpose, all while poking fun at the constant destruction that is brought upon a city full of vigilantes and criminals.

Samantha Nguyen covers entertainment news for MFST. You can follow her on Twitter @thelegendarykc

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