Rule 5 Draft

You’ve seen it written and referred to a zillion ways: the Rule 5 draft, the minor league draft, the rule V drafts, that draft at the Winter Meetings that’s a little too complicated so I’ll wait to see if it matters later . . .

The process doesn’t shake baseball’s rafters, but it does add a wrinkle to the player-development game that’s worth understanding. Every once in a while, a player makes a significant impact after being chosen, Pittsburgh’s Roberto Clemente in 1954 being the classic example.

The Rule 5 draft has been a staple of the Winter Meetings almost from its beginning and sprung up as a method to prevent teams from stockpiling talent in their minor league systems. Players not on major league rosters would otherwise have little or no chance to find an opportunity to play elsewhere, though that restriction was further eased in the 1980s when minor leaguers got the right to become free agents after six full seasons.

Major league teams must protect players on their 40-man rosters within three or four years of their original signing. Those left unprotected are available to other teams as Rule 5 picks.

Players who were 18 or younger on June 5 preceding the signing of their first contract must be protected after four minor league seasons. Players 19 and older must be protected after three seasons.

But here’s the kicker: To prevent teams from drafting players willy-nilly, each Rule 5 pick must be kept in the major leagues the entire following season or be offered back to his former team for half of the $50,000 selection price. Few players are ready for such a jump, so only about 10-15 get picked each year. Fewer still last the whole season in the big leagues.

“They have to keep a guy for the whole year, so a lot of teams are safe,” says Paul Snyder, the Braves’ director of scouting and player development. “But there have been kids drafted out of A-ball.

Now to the actual results of this years Rule 5 draft….

Round 1
1. Twins:  Miguel Diaz, RHP, Brewers
2. Reds: Luis Torrens, C, Yankees
3. Padres: Allen Cordoba, SS, Cardinals
4. Rays: Kevin Gadea, Mariners
5. Braves: Armando Rivero, RHP, Cubs
6. D-backs: Tyler Jones, RHP, Yankees
7. Brewers: Caleb Smith, LHP, Yankees
8. Angels  Justin Haley,RHP, Red Sox
9. White Sox:  Dylan Covey, RHP, A’s
10. Pirates: Tyler Webb, LHP, Yankees
11. Tigers: Daniel Stumpf, LHP, Royals
12. Orioles: Aneury Tavarez, 2B, Red Sox
13. Blue Jays: Glenn Sparkman, RHP, Royals
14. Red Sox: Josh Rutledge, INF, Rockies
15. Indians: Holby Miller, LHP, Phillies
16. Rangers: Michael Hauschild, RHP, Astros

Round 2
17. Reds:  Stuart Turner, C, Twins
18. Orioles:  Anthony Santander, OF, Indians

Each player cost their selecting team $100,000. Each player must remain on the 25-man roster of his new club for the entire season or, at the very least, on the disabled list. If he is removed from the 25-man, the team which selected him has to offer him back to his old team for a nominal fee. Sort of like a stocking fee when you return a mattress or something. Many of these guys, of course, will not be returned and, instead, will be stashed on the DL with phantom injuries.

https://i0.wp.com/www.myfantasysportstalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/a-25.jpg?fit=1024%2C576&ssl=1https://i0.wp.com/www.myfantasysportstalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/a-25.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Dan SchalkMLBRecent Posts#MLB,Rule 5 DraftYou've seen it written and referred to a zillion ways: the Rule 5 draft, the minor league draft, the rule V drafts, that draft at the Winter Meetings that's a little too complicated so I'll wait to see if it matters later . . . The process doesn't shake baseball's...