DLCs and Season Passes are nothing new to gamers, but lately it seems that every game is getting them and more and I find myself clutching my wallet in their presence. Let me explain myself.

 

I play Battlefield 1 a lot. I love the game, it’s the best Battlefield since Bad Company 2. Its first expansion DLC is set to release this month. While I do love the game and plan on playing it well into the foreseeable future, I’m not sure how to go about this DLC. Should I spend the expected $20 for the single expansion or should I pitch in for the Season Pass (Premium Pass in Battlefield’s case) at $50? Well here’s a few things to take into account then trying to decide.

 

Most games typically have a set number of expansions scheduled with its release. Following the Battlefield 1 example, the game is set to have 4 expansion DLCs. Each one probably priced at $20, totaling $80. A Season Pass at $50 will save you $30. But, now it gets complicated. Most games eventually release a “Complete Edition”, or some variation, that includes the base game and all the DLC on disc. Often times at a price below the original $60 release price.

 

Here’s a few pricing models:

  1. $60 at release + $50 for season pass = $110
  1. $60 at release + $20 x 4 = $140
  1. “Complete Edition” at below $60

 

The first option is best for single player games you’re familiar with and big multiplayer games, specifically if you play with a dedicated group of friends. Keeping up with the latest expansion keeps the multiplayer experience fresh and keeps your group together.

 

The second option gives you the flexibility to stop buying and move on from the game. If you bought a multiplayer game that you only play with a few people or a single player game you want to get at around the release date.

 

The “complete edition” option is best for single player games that you don’t mind waiting to play. You’ll end up saving tons of money and get everything. It’s not recommended for multiplayer games, as the game’s popularity and player population could be a lot smaller or non-existent. Some multiplayer games that have skill levels could be particularly brutal on a late starting newcomer. The new Doom game is a perfect title to wait for a “complete edition”.

 

The Season Pass is growing in popularity; most games now have some form of it. Ask yourself how long you envision yourself enjoying the game, better yet don’t buy the pass until the first DLC is out. By then you’ll know if the game is worth the commitment or not. Or use it as a signal to wait for the “Complete Edition” further down the line.

 

Ultimately, you’re the best judge of how long you want to continue playing a game, so whether you buy it all up front or wait a year to get the complete edition, so long as you think the price is worth it then that’s all that matters.

 

https://i2.wp.com/www.myfantasysportstalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/tc-the-division-season-pass-key-art-1920x1080.jpg?fit=1024%2C576&ssl=1https://i2.wp.com/www.myfantasysportstalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/tc-the-division-season-pass-key-art-1920x1080.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Michael GomezAnalysisEntertainmentGamingRecent PostsBattlefield 1 Premium,Premium Pass,season pass,Video GamesDLCs and Season Passes are nothing new to gamers, but lately it seems that every game is getting them and more and I find myself clutching my wallet in their presence. Let me explain myself.   I play Battlefield 1 a lot. I love the game, it's the best Battlefield since...Why go anywhere else for sports and entertainment?